DPhil in History from King’s College London
Junior Research Fellow in Modern Languages

Academic Background

Dorothée Boulanger studied at Sciences-Po Paris, in France,  where she graduated with a BA and a MA in International Relations. After living and working for an NGO in Benin she embarked on a MSt in Gender, Globalisation and Development from the London School of  Economics. She then moved to Angola, where she was a lecturer at the Pontificia and Lusiada Universities in Lobito, in 2009 and 2010.

In 2018, she graduated with a PhD in History from King’s College London. During her time at KCL, Dorothée was a teaching fellow in Lusophone African History and Culture for the departments of History and SPLAS (Spanish, Portuguese and Latin-American Studies).

In 2018 she joined the University of Oxford as a departmental Lecturer for the Portuguese sub-faculty. In January 2020 she started a Leverhulme early career fellowship at the Faculty of Medieval and Modern languages at Oxford, concomitantly with a Junior Research Fellowing at Jesus College.

Undergraduate & Postgraduate Teaching

Contemporary literature, history and culture of Lusophone Africa, particularly Angola; Gender and Masculinities.

Research Interests

Doorthée’s research interests span a large area covering the postcolonial history of Africa, with a particular focus on the connection between literature, intellectual history and gender inequalities.

Her doctoral dissertation offered an intellectual history of Angola through the analysis of fiction literature, questioning the relevance of the disciplinary divide between literature and history in an African context, and examining the ambivalent status and role of writers in Angola after independence.

Her current project adopts a comparative perspective and looks at the postcolonial literature of Zimbabwe, Angola, Algeria and the Congo (Brazzaville) to examine the literary legacies of revolution and internal conflict in postcolonial Africa.

Links

Subject notes for courses taught at Jesus College:

See also Faculty of Modern Languages website.